Aldi customer’s assistance cat sparks fury among shoppers

Aldi customers have been left divided after a picture emerged of an assistance cat perched in a trolley at a supermarket in Jerrabomberra, NSW.

The image, shared to Aldi Fans Australia Facebook page, showed a cat wearing a harness and leash while sitting in the area normally reserved for toddlers.

“Here is something that is rare to see in an Aldi store. It is the first time I have ever seen an assistance cat anywhere in public. Jerrabomberra Aldi, NSW,” the caption read.

Social media users were torn, with some calling it a hygiene issue while others thought it was adorable.

“Yuck, assistance or not. I don’t believe animals should be allowed in our trolleys we put our food,” one person said.

Another commented: “That doesn’t look like an approved assistance harness or leash.”

“What sort of ‘assistance’ does a cat offer? I have cats myself, seems they need to up their game,” one added.

One social media user said: “As someone who is contact allergic to cats and dogs I really hope you clean the trolley well after putting your animal in there.”

One shopper defended the fellow customer, posting: “It’s weird how people object on hygiene grounds, but are fine with toddlers and babies. Not sure they’ve thought that one through.”

Another wrote: “Who really cares if he’s an assistance cat, if he likes shopping then let him do it.”

“This is just beautiful. I used to take my cat in Aldi in her pram,” a shopper revealed.

The Disability Discrimination Act 1992 dictates an assistance animal is accredited under state or territory law that shows it is to assist a person with a disability or alleviate that disability.

It could also be trained by an organisation designated by the Commonwealth or a trained animal with hygiene standards appropriate for a public place.

The legislation also dictates that in public places staff are able to ask for reasonable proof the animal is a genuine assistance animal.

News.com.au understands Aldi’s policy regarding animals is dictated by the Disability Discrimination Act 1992.

Leave a Comment